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This shows the default settings for TCP/IP

The Server IP Address is actually used for two different purposes. First, if you are connecting directly to a game that is created, you can enter the IP address of that game here and it will connect you directly to that game.

Second, Enemy Nations looks for I Serve running on the machine at that address. If IServe is running on that machine, it will connect with IServe. If you are creating a game Enemy Nations will register it's IP address with IServe so others can join your game. If you are joining a game, Enemy Nations will ask IServe for all IP address it has to list out available games.

Note: IServe will send newly created games to all games looking to join after the initial list of games is received. So you do not have to re-publish to see games created after you start looking.

Note: You can enter either names or IP address The Socket is the channel you are communicating on. All players and IServe must be on the same socket. 1707 has been assigned to Windward Studios for Enemy Nations so it is strongly recommended that you not change this number.

Troubleshooting

Step 1: Make sure that all of your settings above are correct. If you are connecting directly to another game or to another copy of IServe, check with the person at the other end and verify the settings.

Step 2: Make sure that you can communicate with the other machine. To do this you want to ping the other machine. Bring up a DOS box and type ping windward.net (substitute the name of the server you are connecting to). You should see a response like this:

If you get any kind of error message then you cannot communicate with that machine for some reason. If this is your problem we can't help you - you need to talk to your network support team.

In this case you should try pinging other servers to determine where the problem is. Start with a system close to you and then one at another corporation.

Note: windward.net is down about once a month, usually because we lose power for over 5 minutes.

Step 3: If you can ping the machine you want to connect to but cannot join a game, bring up the Advanced dialog and press the Diagnostics button. To run the diagnostics, both you and the person creating the game need to be running it. The diagnostics are designed to get two specific machines connected.

The advanced settings^ in IPX look like this

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Net Number: J Node Number | IPX Socket: |1707 OK | Cancel \ Help... ) Diagnostics .

The Net Number and Node Number should normally be left blank. These will identify a specific machine and can be used to connect to someone creating a game if there is a bridge or router between you and the other machine that don't pass on broadcast packets.

The IPX Socket is the channel that communication occurs on. This must match on all systems. Novell would not assign us our own number so we randomly picked this socket number. This number may conflict with an existing application in which case all players should change to a different number.

Note: We requested Novell to assign us a socket number and they agreed to do so. However, when they discovered that Enemy Netions would run on Microsoft's IPX instead of requiring Novell's IPX, they then decided to not assign us a socket.

Troubleshooting

Step I: Make sure that all of your settings above are correct. Check with the person creating the game and verily the settings.

Step 2: Bring up the Advanced dialog and press the Diagnostics button. To run the diagnostics, both you and the person creating the game need to be running it. The diagnostics are designed to get two specific machines connected.

NETBIOS

The advanced settings in NETBIOS look like this:

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The LANA is the LAN Adapter Number. This was originally specified so you could have multiple net cards in one computer. However, today NETBIOS generally runs on top of another protocol such as TCP/IP or IPX and each separate instance of NETBIOS has a separate LANA.

This is a giant pain because all systems playing the game must be on the same NETBIOS protocol. If you are using the NETBIOS running on top of TCP/IP and the others are playing on the NETBIOS running on top of IPX then you cannot communicate with them.

There is no easy way to determine which LANA on one machine matches the LANA on a second machine. On two of the test systems used for Enemy Nations LANA 0 on one talked to LANA 7 on the other and LANA 7 talked to LANA 0.

The drop down combo box will only show LANA numbers that there are protocols loaded for. This is generally only 1 or 2 values. If it's one value you're set (assuming the other players have the same NETBIOS loaded).

Otherwise you can either select one, try to connect, if it fails, try the next. Or you can use the Diagnostics which will get two machines talking. (NETBIOS was the primary reason we wrote the diagnostics.)

The Name is a unique name Enemy Nations assigns to your computer. It is virtually impossible for the name Enemy Nations will pick for you to not be unique.

However, you can override this setting. If you do and the name conflicts you will get an error when you try to publish a game.

Troubleshooting

Step I: Make sure that all of your settings above are correct. You probably have the wrong LANA number. Remember, the LANA numbers commonly have to be different to communicate.

Step 2: Bring up the Advanced dialog and press the Diagnostics button. To run the diagnostics, both you and the person creating the game need to be running it. The diagnostics are designed to get two specific machines connected.

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